Posts Tagged With: physical geology

An Experiment with Open Pedagogy

I’m still working on the third edition of our physical geology open textbook (I really should be done by now, but you know how these things go), and thought it would be a nice touch to include vignettes about how geological events have affected people.

Not lists of damage to property and infrastructure, or the costs incurred, or the number of fatalities. I was thinking about descriptions in the words of people who were there. What did they see or hear or smell? What did the air taste like? What did they think about as they watched the event unfold? What was it like to be there?

I wanted students to have a connection with those events that went beyond knowing a list of facts. Why? As Maya Angelou put it, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Making vignettes for an open textbook was an opportunity to expose students to the idea of “open.” I told them that many people have generously shared their work online, often permitting it to be adapted and remixed in addition to allowing others to re-use and redistribute it free of charge. I told them about Creative Commons licenses, and Public Domain, and made it a project requirement that they use only open-access materials.

The vignettes themselves took the form of posters. I provided detailed criteria, but key points were that students must use language accessible to another student who has never taken a geology course before, and that posters should be 1 part science and 2 parts lived experience. Less important, but really cool, the poster also had to include an augmented reality component via HP Reveal. Here’s the sample I gave them.

poster_small_view

Sample poster (by me) with a first-hand account of the eruption of Mt. Pelee in 1902. Eye-witness account courtesy of the Digital History Project. Get the poster as a PDF file.

To see the augmented-reality element of the poster—a pop-up video montage of images from the eruption—download the HP Reveal app for your smartphone or tablet, and follow my account (username karlapanchuk). Then view the poster through the app. Or, click here to see the video.

I had a few questions going into the project:

Will the posters be appropriate for the textbook? There’s the matter of accuracy, but in an open textbook accuracy isn’t enough. Materials must also have the right license.

In the limited time available, is it possible to teach students enough about open access and Creative Commons to have them make the right choices about which materials to use, and how to use those materials?

Can I be reasonably certain that students understand what it means to release their own work under a Creative Commons license, and that they have a choice about whether and how to do that?

Norma_thinking

Norma Talmadge, photographed in 1922. Norma doesn’t have answers either. Photographer unknown. View source.

Mostly, I still have those questions, but here are some things I learned:

Thing 1. A 20-minute lecture is not the best way to give students a working knowledge of open-access resources, and how to find and use them.

Thing 2. I’m not confident about how to balance teaching about open access with teaching geology. Should I minimize the time I spend Creative-Commons-proselytizing and restrict students to sources where I know materials have appropriate licenses? That seems like a missed opportunity, though.

Thing 3. An entirely realistic outcome is that a student will add “Public Domain” to all figure captions regardless of whether the images are in the public domain or not. I need a way to make students accountable for their choices that isn’t me spending days tracking down the copyright status of every image students use. Perhaps this is a job for peer review.

Thing 4. Some classroom experiments generate a roomful of quizzical eyebrow gymnastics that translate roughly as “I thought this class was about rocks.”

 

Categories: Open access, Teaching strategies | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

The open textbook arrives- For real this time!

Textbook coverApparently I’m not the only person who has seen a need for an open textbook for introductory physical geology. BCcampus has just released one, and I was lucky enough to get in at the tail end of the process and add a chapter on the origin of Earth and the solar system.

In case you haven’t heard of open before, these are resources which are free to use, and are available with non-restrictive or minimally restrictive licenses, or released to the public domain.  This particular book has a CC-BY license. That means anyone can use the book in any way they please, so long as they give the creator appropriate credit, and note whether any changes have been made.  Quite simply, it’s a free textbook.

A lot of work went into this book, and that is evident when you look through it. The author, Steven Earle, not only explained a wide range of topics in an enthusiastic and conversational style, but he also drew or adapted a great many figures. From my own experience, I can tell you that figure drawing takes up a lot more time than the actual writing. (But then again, I’m the sort to vacillate between shadow settings or tweak a font for 5 to 10 minutes before I’m happy with it.)

This textbook has a special focus on the geology of British Columbia.  That’s a Canadian focus that many commercially available physical geology textbooks have lacked until recently, judging by the regular shipment of freebies I get from the textbook companies.

The textbook is not only accessible as an online resource, but it can also be downloaded in a variety of electronic formats- you could put it on an e-reader, for example.

The online version of the book is built in Pressbooks, and I was immediately enamored of the aesthetics and ease of navigation… so much so I got my own Pressbooks account for experimentation. I’m finding it a bit slow, however my internet signal fails on really windy days (one of the perils of a rural home office), so maybe it’s not their fault.

The one feature of this textbook which has had the greatest impact on me is the fact that I can edit it- all by my lonesome, no permission required. In its current form, the book presents some of the topics differently than I do in my course, so I inquired about making the changes. The result? Amanda, a lovely lady from BCcampus, emailed me the latest version of the XML file, and I imported it into my Pressbooks account. It was that easy. (The XML file is one of the download options as well.)

I was pleasantly surprised at how straightforward it was to get something I could edit, but what surprised me most of all was the immense sense of relief I felt when I discovered that there were no barriers to making the textbook fit my needs. I’ve always been a bit of a control freak when it comes to my course materials- on a bad day that translates to downright resentment at not being able to fix things that need fixing- but I had no idea that I was so stressed out about not being able to control my textbooks.

Categories: Learning technologies, Textbooks | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

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